How do you say goodbye in Prague?

How do you respond to Jak se mas?

The standard response to the question “Jak se máš?” is “Mám se dobře/špatně,” whether you’re feeling respectively good or bad. Alternatively, if you’re unwell you can use “Je mi blbě /špatně.”

How do you end an email in Czech Republic?

part of the Czech school system. If you want to be formal, then you can end emails (or letters if you need to write one) with s pozdravem. This expression is used exclusively in writing. Alternatively, one can use sbohem, literally ‘with God’.

Can I have a beer please in Czech?

The word pivo means beer in Czech. So, to communicate “Can I have a beer please“ in Czech, simply say, “Pivo, prosim“, which means “Beer, please“.

What is Jak se mas mean?

“Jak se mas” is the Czech version of “what’s up” meaning “how are you doing?“. In the United States, it’s commonly used between people of Czech Heritage, and those who are just exploring and getting into Czech Culture. In Texas, it is especially common to spot this greeting on bumper stickers throughout the state.

How do you address an email in Czech Republic?

E-Mail – Opening

  1. Dear John, Milý Johne, Informal, standard way of addressing a friend.
  2. Dear Mum / Dad, Milá mamko / Milý taťko. …
  3. Dear Uncle Jerome, Milý strejdo Jerome, …
  4. Hello John, Ahoj Johne, …
  5. Hey John, Čau Johne, …
  6. John, Johne, …
  7. My Dear, Můj milý / Má milá, …
  8. My Dearest, Můj/Má nejdražší,
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How do you address someone in Czech Republic?

If you want to be nice and official you should use “pane” for men, and “paní” for women, this is the equivalent of “sir” and “madame” or “Mr.” and “Ms.” “Tykání ” is the informal way of addressing friends (the opposite of Vykání) and you should only use it when conversing with close friends and family…

How do you say yes in Czech Republic?

Click on any of the linked Czech words to play them in your audio player. The audio is available in Real Audio.

yes ano
I’m sorry. Promiňte.
Thank you. Děkuji.
You’re welcome. Není zač. / Prosím.